The Secret Man

The Secret Man

The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat

Book - 2005
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Baker & Taylor
Presents an examination of the author's long and complex relationship with the FBI official responsible for providing him with the details of the Watergate break-in, which ultimately resulted in the resignation of President Nixon.

Blackwell North Amer
In Washington, D.C., where little stays secret for long, the identity of Deep Throat - the mysterious source who helped Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein break open the Watergate scandal in 1972 - remained hidden for 33 years. Now, Woodward tells the story of his long, complex relationship with W. Mark Felt, the enigmatic former No. 2 man in the Federal Bureau of Investigation who helped end the presidency of Richard Nixon.
The Secret Man chronicles the story in intimate detail, from Woodward's first, chance encounter with Felt in the Nixon White House, to their covert, middle-of-the-night meetings in an underground parking garage, to the aftermath of Watergate and decades beyond, until Felt finally stepped forward at age 91 to unmask himself as Deep Throat.
In this volume, part memoir, part morality tale, part political and journalistic history, Woodward provides context and detail about The Washington Post's expose of Watergate. He examines his later tense relationship with Felt, when the FBI man stood charged with authorizing FBI burglaries. (Not knowing Felt's secret role in the demise of his own presidency, Nixon testified at Felt's trial, and Ronald Reagan later pardoned him.) Woodward lays bare his own personal struggles as he tries to define his relationship, his obligations, and his gratitude to this extraordinary confidential source.
The Secret Man is an intense, 33-year journey, providing a one-of-a-kind study of trust, deception, pressures, alliances, doubts and a lifetime of secrets. Woodward has spent more than three decades asking himself why Mark Felt became Deep Throat. Now the world can see what happened and why, brining to a close one of the last chapters of Watergate.

Simon and Schuster
In Washington, D.C., where little stays secret for long, the identity of Deep Throat -- the mysterious source who helped Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein break open the Watergate scandal in 1972 -- remained hidden for 33 years. Now, Woodward tells the story of his long, complex relationship with W. Mark Felt, the enigmatic former No. 2 man in the Federal Bureau of Investigation who helped end the presidency of Richard Nixon.The Secret Man chronicles the story in intimate detail, from Woodward's first, chance encounter with Felt in the Nixon White House, to their covert, middle-of-the-night meetings in an underground parking garage, to the aftermath of Watergate and decades beyond, until Felt finally stepped forward at age 91 to unmask himself as Deep Throat.The Secret Man reveals the struggles of a patriotic career FBI man, an admirer of J. Edgar Hoover, the Bureau's legendary director. After Hoover's death, Mark Felt found himself in the cross fire of one of Washington's historic contests, as Nixon and his men tried to dominate the Bureau and cover up the crimes of the administration. This book illuminates the ongoing clash between temporary political power and the permanent bureaucracy of government. Woodward explores Felt's conflicts and motives as he became Deep Throat, not only secretly confirming Woodward and Bernstein's findings from dozens of other sources, but giving a sense of the staggering sweep of Nixon's criminal abuses.In this volume, part memoir, part morality tale, part political and journalistic history, Woodward provides context and detail about The Washington Post's expose of Watergate. He examines his later, tense relationship with Felt, when the FBI man stood charged with authorizing FBI burglaries. (Not knowing Felt's secret role in the demise of his own presidency, Nixon testified at Felt's trial, and Ronald Reagan later pardoned him.) Woodward lays bare his own personal struggles as he tries to define his relationship, his obligations, and his gratitude to this extraordinary confidential source.The Secret Man is an intense, 33-year journey, providing a one-of-a-kind study of trust, deception, pressures, alliances, doubts and a lifetime of secrets. Woodward has spent more than three decades asking himself why Mark Felt became Deep Throat. Now the world can see what happened and why, bringing to a close one of the last chapters of Watergate.

Publisher: New York : Simon & Schuster, c2005
ISBN: 9780743287159
0743287150
Characteristics: 249 p. ; 22 cm

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mammothhawk229e
Jan 02, 2019

Okay, truth stranger than legend in that author knew flawed Deep Throat longer or that contact did similar things as Watergate bumblers & got a criminal record.
Author struggled with ethics over should he reveal who his slowly losing his marbles source was & the context on why Deep Throat did what he did & the talks with Deep Throat's family on dilemma.
I was amused at all the conspiracy theorists' flawed methodology to out Deep Throat over the years.
Carl made a thoughtful quote on partnerships in Watergate reporting.
"In all, it added up to a feeling of solidarity. Today's Internet bloggers and television's talking heads don't have that. No safety net. No brakes. No one there to question, doubt or inspire. No editor."

s
StarGladiator
May 16, 2017

More sham, in care of the CIA's Mockingbird Program, begun in the early 1950s, employing various types - - usually former intel types soon to be placed in the so-called media [Woodward from NCIS, that former special assistant to Allen Dulles, Tom Braden, who had radio talk show with Pat Buchanan in the 1980s, and claimed to be a // liberal \\ yeah, ROTFL to the max, and the O'Leary boys, et cetera] - - always used // unnamed sources \\ how utterly convenient!
Felt was supposed to be Woodward's Deep Throat - - mystery solved?! Except, how did Felt come by those private talks between Kissinger and Nixon - - very mysterious, that?
But Kissinger had known Felt for many years, dating back to his Harvard days, when Kissinger would call his contact at the FBI [who just happened to be Mark Felt] and claim that other academics he was competing with for tenure at Harvard were actually no-good commies.
Will coincidences never cease? And speaking of unnamed sources, that building and it's underground garage where Woodward was supposed to have met Felt all those times, I once read a story of someone the Washington Post claimed worked at the World Bank and lived in that building, so as the Jesuits who raised me at a Catholic orphanage kept pounding into me, always ask the next question: I looked into her background and found she was actually a contractor working at the World Bank through Development Alternatives, Inc. Same firm which President Obama's mother had worked at; same firm that Mr. Gross, who attempted to set up a spy network in Cuba, whom President Obama sprung from a Cuban jail when he opened relations with Cuba, also worked at. Turns out almost everyone in that building Woodward met his deep throat at also worked at Development Alternatives, Inc., a CIA-front company. Will wonders - - or is that coincidences - - never cease?????

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