Samurai William

Samurai William

The Englishman Who Opened Japan

Book - 2003
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Baker & Taylor
Tells the story of William Adams, a marooned English mariner who was allowed to live in a land formerly forbidden to foreigners for centures.

Holtzbrinck
02
An eye-opening account of the first encounter between England and Japan, by the acclaimed author of Nathaniel's Nutmeg

In 1611, the merchants of London's East India Company received a mysterious letter from Japan, written several years previously by a marooned English mariner named William Adams. Foreigners had been denied access to Japan for centuries, yet Adams had been living in this unknown land for years. He had risen to the highest levels in the ruling shogun's court, taken a Japanese name, and was now offering his services as adviser and interpreter.

Seven adventurers were sent to Japan with orders to find and befriend Adams, in the belief that he held the key to exploiting the opulent riches of this forbidden land. Their arrival was to prove a momentous event in the history of Japan and the shogun suddenly found himself facing a stark choice: to expel the foreigners and continue with his policy of isolation, or to open his country to the world. For more than a decade the English, helped by Adams, were to attempt trade with the shogun, but confounded by a culture so different from their own, and hounded by scheming Jesuit monks and fearsome Dutch assassins, they found themselves in a desperate battle for their lives.

Samurai William is the fascinating story of a clash of two cultures, and of the enormous impact one Westerner had on the opening of the East.
An eye-opening account of the first encounter between England and Japan, by the acclaimed author of Nathaniel's Nutmeg

In 1611, the merchants of London's East India Company received a mysterious letter from Japan, written several years previously by a marooned English mariner named William Adams. Foreigners had been denied access to Japan for centuries, yet Adams had been living in this unknown land for years. He had risen to the highest levels in the ruling shogun's court, taken a Japanese name, and was now offering his services as adviser and interpreter.

Seven adventurers were sent to Japan with orders to find and befriend Adams, in the belief that he held the key to exploiting the opulent riches of this forbidden land. Their arrival was to prove a momentous event in the history of Japan and the shogun suddenly found himself facing a stark choice: to expel the foreigners and continue with his policy of isolation, or to open his country to the world. For more than a decade the English, helped by Adams, were to attempt trade with the shogun, but confounded by a culture so different from their own, and hounded by scheming Jesuit monks and fearsome Dutch assassins, they found themselves in a desperate battle for their lives.

Samurai William is the fascinating story of a clash of two cultures, and of the enormous impact one Westerner had on the opening of the East.


Blackwell North Amer
The true story behind James Clavell's best-selling Shogun Samurai William is the incredible tale of a man who tried to bridge two very different cultures during one of the earliest and most fascinating encounters between East and West.
In 1611, the merchants of London's East India Company received a startling letter from Japan, written by a marooned English mariner named William Adams. Even though foreigners had been denied access to this unknown land for centuries, Adams had been living there for years. He had taken a Japanese name, risen to the highest levels in the ruling shogun's court, and was now offering his services as adviser and interpreter.
Seven adventurers were sent to Japan with orders to find and befriend Adams in the belief that he held the key to exploiting the riches to be discovered there. But, overwhelmed by the exotic attractions of this new and forbidden country, and failing to grasp the intricacies of a culture so different from their own, the Englishmen quickly found themselves at odds with the ruling shogun. For more than a decade, the English, helped by Adams, attempted trade with the shogun. Faced with the difficulties of communicating, and hounded by scheming Jesuit monks and fearsome Dutch assassins, they eventually found themselves in a desperate battle for their lives.

Baker
& Taylor

Vividly recreates England's first encounter with Japan, an exotic country that had been inaccessible to foreigners for years, which was brought about when

Publisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2003
Edition: 1st American ed
ISBN: 9780374253851
0374253854
Characteristics: 352 p. : ill., maps ; 22 cm

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