A Room of One's Own

A Room of One's Own

Book - 2005
Average Rating:
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Houghton
In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different.This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But if only she had found the means to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this classic essay,Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have a fixed income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create.

Annotated and with an introduction by Susan Gubar


Baker & Taylor
Describes the domestic obligations, social limitations, and economic factors that impede literary creativity in women, in the story of William Shakespeare's sister, who never expresses her genius until she dies by her own hand.

Harcourt Publishing
In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different.This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But if only she had found the means to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this classic essay,Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have a fixed income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create.

Annotated and with an introduction by Susan Gubar


Blackwell North Amer
In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different. This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But had she been allowed to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this essay, Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have an income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create.

Baker
& Taylor

Describes the domestic obligations, social limitations, and economic factors that impede literary creativity in women, in the story of William Shakespeare's talented sister, who, because of the mores of her time, never expresses her genius until she dies by her own hand. Reprint.

Publisher: Orlando, Fla. : Harcourt, c2005
Edition: 1st Harvest ed.
ISBN: 9780156030410
0156030411
Characteristics: lxi, 148 p. ; 21 cm
Additional Contributors: Gubar, Susan 1944-

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d
dewwell
Oct 10, 2017

I'm sorry, but I thought this might be one of her actual "works," not an essay about women and writing and her feelings about women and life and whatnot. I might enjoy this more after I've read some of her fiction. As it is, I've never read her, and hope KCLS has some in large print.

k
kpelish
Apr 26, 2017

Glad I finally got to read this classic, especially contrasted against the rich tapestry that women writers weave today. In many ways, Woolf's impassioned fight for women's right to an income of her own/financial stability and cherished private space to reflect and create has come true; she wrote these lyrical essays back in 1928 (she's very humorous as she describes her encounters with the university beadles). In some ways, it's still an ongoing fight (fair pay, better gender balance at home with partners, equal representation in politics and the workplace, freedom from violence, etc.) but at least these issues are out in the open and easier to resolve (or "shrink", as the following passage illustrates: "Women have served all these centuries as looking-glasses possessing the magic and delicious power of reflecting the figure of man at twice its natural size....if she begins to tell the truth, the figure in the looking glass shrinks.")

b
becker
Apr 08, 2016

What an incredibly interesting woman of her time. It was a privilege and a pleasure to be privy to her inner thoughts. She is so beautifully expressive that it made me quite emotional in places.

l
LaFilm
Dec 01, 2015

The prose, the talk of feminism, women and art; I loved.

Gratefulee Feb 16, 2013

A brilliant classic, poignantly profound and relevant for its time, while also being way ahead of its time. This timely and timeless talk turned essay, offered to women at Cambridge, by Virginia Woolf, nearly a century ago is still quite a timely testament for today's girls and women, and any caring creative human being who wishes to retain and express their heart and mind, in spite of their limit of income, time and other worldly resources. Enjoy!

rprivette Jan 30, 2012

semi-autobiographical; historical slice of life; extended essay

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