The Weird Sisters

The Weird Sisters

Book - 2011
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Penguin Putnam
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A major new talent tackles the complicated terrain of sisters, the power of books, and the places we decide to call home.

There is no problem that a library card can't solve.

The Andreas family is one of readers. Their father, a renowned Shakespeare professor who speaks almost entirely in verse, has named his three daughters after famous Shakespearean women. When the sisters return to their childhood home, ostensibly to care for their ailing mother, but really to lick their wounds and bury their secrets, they are horrified to find the others there. See, we love each other. We just don't happen to like each other very much. But the sisters soon discover that everything they've been running from-one another, their small hometown, and themselves-might offer more than they ever expected.


Baker & Taylor
Unwillingly brought together to care for their ailing mother, three sisters who were named after famous Shakespearean characters discover that everything they have been avoiding may prove more worthwhile than expected.

Baker
& Taylor

Unwillingly brought together to care for their ailing mother, three sisters who were named after famous Shakespearean characters discover that everything they have been avoiding may prove more worthwhile than expected. A first novel.

Publisher: New York : Amy Einhorn Books/G.P. Putnam's Sons, c2011
ISBN: 9780399157226
0399157220
Characteristics: 320 p. ; 24 cm

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AnnabelleLee27 Feb 22, 2017

A novel about family, relationships, growing up, and redemption set in a family of three sisters named after famous Shakespearean characters. The writing is vivid, poignant, insightful, and witty and the characters are interesting and well drawn. Some reviewers did not care for the first-person-plural style narration finding it intrusive or unclear but I enjoyed how it bound the three main characters together in a new and inventive way. The novel ends happily and if I have one critique it would be that the ending is a bit too tidy and simplistic to be believable. Still, I thoroughly enjoyed the book and have found that the themes and characters have stuck with me since I finished.

PinesandPrejudice Feb 11, 2017

Eleanor Brown's writing is flawless and flows through the mind and off the tongue in colorful and mesmerizing ways. I adore her writing style -- it's visual and dynamic. This story was centered around three sisters and specifically examines their roles in the family and how it effects who they are as people, specifically adults. I enjoyed joining these women on their journey but my two biggest critiques of it were 1) I struggle with books where women specifically sisters are mean to each other for no real reason and 2) I was annoyed by the style of the narrator who continuously used "We" even though there were only three sisters. It was rather distracting from the story as a whole. Otherwise, I'm still a fan.

j
JudithE
Dec 17, 2016

I really liked this novel. Cheerful, interesting, and happy endings! Great for listening to in the car. I didn't mind the group narrator at all, once I figured it was the sisters as a group. And the quotes felt entirely believable to me.

b
Butterfly121761
Jul 28, 2016

I did not like the way it was narrated. I kept wondering if there was a 4th sister or someone else at times but it was pretty obvious there wasn't. I also wasn't really fond of the shakespeare quotes BUT that aside I liked the book. I found I had to continue to read because I wanted to know more about each of the characters. I would consider reading another one of her novels in the future.

4
4catsdogs
Jun 01, 2016

I was extremely annoyed at the contrived way the book is written. The reader does not know who is narrating. There are only three sisters, yet "our mother" is referred to but not by any of them. I found the story ponderous and rather boring. We didn't get to know the characters, who could have been cardboard cut-outs.

l
LexiLou2
May 11, 2016

A unique idea to have poetry quotations as how characters communicate. A thoughtful depiction of family issues. Personally, I skimmed through the last 150pages as it began to feel a bit long winded and predictable.

t
TheresaAJ
Apr 30, 2015

The Weird Sisters was the April 2015 selection for the Willa Cather Book Club. The story revolves around 3 sisters, Rose, Bean, and Cordy, who return home in their late 20s and early 30s. They arrive to find their mother ill with a recent cancer diagnosis and each sister in a state of crisis. This novel, liberally laden with Shakespeare quotes, is a novel about 3 women finding a way to grow up.

A patron review from the Adult Summer Reading Game: "There is no problem a library card can't solve." These wise and wonderful words appear on the overleaf of The Weird Sisters, and set the tone for the adventures of the quirky Andreas sisters. Rose, the oldest, suffers from a failure to launch, while her siblings Bianca and Cordelia have launched--directly into the waiting arms of Trouble. A family crisis brought all three back home, and under the same roof, where they're going to have to go several rounds with Reality before the book is over.

It sounds pretty formulaic but it really isn't. The Weird Sisters is heart-tugging without being maudlin, smart withing being condenscending, and real without turning the Andreas family into a circus of dysfunction. True, they have some serious problems to tackle. But...William Shakespeare plays a strong supporting role in the story and I think that by about page 300, even he would be able to tell that most everything was going to pretty much "end well."

If you have siblings, you'll recognize some of the contortions that the relationship between the three sisters udnergoes. I loved Brown's first-person-plural construction (I think that's what you call it). As the oldest sibling in a close threesome, I know how easy it is to start thinking of yourselves as one entity with three heads.

I'm surprised that this is Elanor Brown's first novel. She's a wonderful storyteller and this is one of those rare ficiton books where you feel like the time you spent with the characters was well worth it. Highly recommended.

LibraryLifeHack Jul 12, 2013

“There is no problem a library card can’t solve.” These words set the tone for the adventures of the quirky Andreas sisters. Rose, the oldest, suffers from a failure to launch, while her siblings Bianca and Cordelia have launched – directly into the waiting arms of Trouble. A family crisis has brought all three back home, and under the same roof, where they’re going to have to go several rounds with Reality before the book is over.

It sounds pretty formulaic but it really isn’t. The Weird Sisters is heart-tugging without being maudlin, smart without being condescending, and real without turning the Andreas family into a circus of dysfunction.

If you have siblings, you’ll recognize some of the contortions that the relationship between the three sisters undergoes.

I’m surprised that this is Eleanor Brown’s first novel. She’s a wonderful storyteller and this is one of those rare fiction books where you feel like the time you spent with the characters was well worth it. Highly recommended.

c
candle
Mar 26, 2013

An enjoyable read if a little unbelievable regarding the father quoting Shakespeare at every drop of the hat.

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Quotes

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a
andreareads
Jan 26, 2012

when she discovered how to sneak out of the house on Friday and Saturday nights and follow the sounds of hysteria and beer, she had learned to flirt through the haze of smoke and noise, how to kiss without making any promises, and how to reel a man across the room with only a look.

a
andreareads
Jan 26, 2012

when I am waiting in line, at the gym, on the train, eating lunch, I am not complaining about the wait/staring into space/admiring myself in available reflective surfaces? I am _reading_!

a
andreareads
Jan 26, 2012

she’s with Lyssie (short for Lysistrata – whenever we complain about our unfashionable names, we remember that we could have been the daughters of a classics professor)

a
andreareads
Jan 26, 2012

Cordy was sorely underprepared for the fact that her smile and her ability to get an entire room full of Shakespearean scholars to do the Macarena (true story) would not necessarily guarantee her perennial success.

a
andreareads
Jan 26, 2012

This is our mother. The four horsemen of the Apocalypse could be bearing down hard and fast upon us, and she would want to make sure our father had eaten. So he wouldn’t, you know, get hungry in the afterlife or something.

a
andreareads
Jan 26, 2012

She read her way through Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys, and looked for clues everywhere she went, noting them down in her _Harriet the Spy_ notebook, though she found their unwillingness to add up to anything a perennial disappointment.

a
andreareads
Jan 26, 2012

she knew it was crazy and stupid, and completely unlike her, and conceivably that is why she agreed to go along with it.

julij Jan 24, 2011

"There is no problem that a library card can't solve." Great quote from THE WEIRD SISTERS by Eleanor Brown. twitter.com/@eleanorwrites

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louiseparsons
Nov 23, 2011

louiseparsons thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

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