The Wise Man's Fear

The Wise Man's Fear

Book - 2011
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Kvothe takes his first steps on the path of the hero as he attempts to uncover the truth about the mysterious Amyr, the Chandrian, and the death of his parents. Along the way, Kvothe is put on trial by the legendary Adem mercenaries, forced to reclaim the honor of the Edema Ruh, and travels into the Fae realm where he meets Felurian, the faerie woman no man can resist.
Publisher: New York : DAW Books ; [New York] : Distributed by Penguin Group, ©2011
ISBN: 9780756404734
0756404738
9780756407124
0756407125
Characteristics: 993 pages : map ; 24 cm

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SCL_Justin Aug 05, 2017

The Wise Man’s Fear is the sequel to Patrick Rothfuss’ The Name of the Wind. It remains a solid fantasy story, though it feels a bit more generic as it goes along. Kvothe hunts bandits and goes to the faerie realm and becomes a badass fighter in an exotic school with different cultural norms around sec, along with his magickal university exploits. There’s not much crazily new to this story compared to any other high fantasy kind of thing based on someone’s D&D campaign.

But Rothfuss just writes it all really well. The dialogue is great. The situations are more realistic and well-detailed versions of things you see in lesser books (well, the women are written more poorly than the men). I’ve gotten a little frustrated with the breakneck pace of how much has happened in three years of Kvothe’s life, but whatever. You don’t read a fantasy novel for its boring people I guess.

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ladxcore
Aug 02, 2017

These books are very entertaining, but the female characters in them are so embarrassingly badly written. This book also has a lot of super cringeworthy sex scenes, and a couple of weird homophobic jokes thrown in for fun. So, on par with a lot of other fantasy books, but wouldn't it be nice if we could do better?

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ZE1TGE15T
Aug 01, 2017

Can't decide if I liked the first or second one better. This is one of my top 5, easy.

This story continues the same writing style and picks up from where the first left off, being told from the present in the tavern.

The story seems very random, like Rothfuss starts with a shell and a few set events for the story, but just writes whatever comes to mind regarding the rest. Which doesn't imply sloppiness or lacking in any sense. It's delightfully surprising and random, yet includes gripping scenes, characters and settings.

Rothfuss does like his words and he is a great artist with them.

I thought some of Kvothe's time with the Adem dragged a little, but the patient lessons Kvothe learns couldn't take less time to convey...so it wasn't too bothering. I also loved that Zen culture. But all this rambling. It isn't of the Lethani.

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angelamuliu
Jun 17, 2017

An enjoyable, if long read. Unlike Name of the Wind, which I couldn't put down and read through it all over three days, The Wise Man's Fear was something I had to finish over the course of a few months. Don't get me wrong, the book is well written and lovely. The world is immersive, the magic interesting, the main character dangerously curious. But I will say the first half of the book drags on as Kvothe goes through the university, with only a few very interesting moments. The second half really picks up once Kvothe leaves the university (spoilers? It was bound to happen one day) and at that moment I was hooked, just like when I read the first book. A very slow start but well worth the effort.

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lijiao12billion
Nov 23, 2016

Absolutely loved it.

You can see the difference in Kvothe throughout the book, after his experiences, each one unique. Every now and then there's a break though, a pause, to remind you that this is happening after it's happened, it's an autobiography of sorts. That after all of this and whatever else is next, in the end Kvothe is a broken man, and this is a broken story.

Now, one of the things that drives me to like reading are the characters. I find the type of stories I'm drawn to are always the ones with unique characters and their relationships with others. The Wise Man's Fear fits this perfectly. I loved reading about his odd relationship with Maer, his experiences in Ademre and the Adem, and all that happened after back at the University. And the little extras, like the fake-Edema Ruh troupe, only adds to the effect. And finding out that Elodin new Adem? Wow!

There were some spots I didn't like, of course, one of which was the long recount of his time with Feluran. After passing through that though it gave a sense of perspective. It's a story told by the man who experienced it, so of course there are going to be some times where you dwell on one thing more than another.

For one last comment... I just realized that the prologue and the epilogue are exactly the same, save for the first sentence. Adds an interesting effect, I think, and I wonder if the first book was like that too.

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Groovius
Oct 02, 2016

Overall this novel was quite entertaining and not a bad successor to The Name of the Wind. Considering its size (994 pages) the writing proved fairly even, though at times the author did tend toward indulgence. Kvothe’s time spent in the Fae, for instance, went on and on for at least one hundred pages. At the end of which time the protagonist got nothing more than a fairy cloak of questionable narrative value out of the deal. And then there was the sadistic talking tree. But had he left out most of the pointless frolicking with Felurian (a fairy sex goddess), he could have gotten to the point far sooner. There were other examples, too, where the author lingered far too long on a scene when he should have moved on. Is it any wonder then this book is the doorstop it is?

Another issue I had were situations in which Kvothe found himself that lacked practical credibility. The Maer Alveron, for instance, soliciting advice on love and romance from the same, inexperienced 15 year old Kvothe. This struck me as unlikely in the extreme; so, too, placing Kvothe—after our hero landed the apple of the Maer’s eye in the same Maer’s lap—in charge of a group of mercenaries to hunt down a gang of rascally bandits, when said youth had no martial training and knew nothing of mercenaries or bandits. But once again, due to the book’s sheer size, all these plot quibbles I had were spaced quite far apart in the story, which made them less obtrusive—thankfully. Having said all that, and contrary to the tone of this review, I enjoyed the yarn Rothfuss has spun for us and I recommend The Wise Man's Fear to all lovers of epic fantasy.

Way too long and too wordy, too much detail about everyday life in this fantasy world so that the plot line drags. Strongly agree with Peter1962 comments

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cstevens0909
May 20, 2016

This book was obviously a bridge between the first book and what is to be the third, but that does not mean it is any less amazing. Leaves you wanting the third in a very bad way. The gritty details of Kvothe's romantic encounters were unnecessary, but that's my only complaint.

FindingJane May 09, 2016

This story gets better and better. The main character is a man filled with flaws but they are intrinsic and vital parts of his character. His over-swift tongue and his insatiable curiosity make a hero who is as playful as he is serious. Kvothe’s nature is mercurial but always consistent with his surroundings and the situation.

In this novel, we find Kvothe travelling a great deal and engaging in various adventures. On the surface, they read like anything you might expect of a man on a quest—the pursuit of money and heroic deeds, the enchantment of beautiful, otherworldly women and the immersion in an alien culture. But Kvothe isn’t in this for mere glory. His traveler nature—which he gets from both his parents—encourages him to seek out and learn about others, even when he might come off the worse for the affair.

What I truly liked about this novel was the introduction to the mysterious Ademre, a mercenary culture whose ways were baffling to outsiders. Taciturn to the point of muteness, all people have ever noticed about them are their odd red clothes (presumably the badge of their bloody office), the refusal to talk or look people in the eye and their constant, incessant twitching that makes them look as if they have the palsy. Kvothe’s willingness to probe and question repeatedly and, finally, to accompany a friend to their remote home gets him to the heart of the matter.

The Ademre are a fascinating creation and you can’t help but wish they were real by the time you finish reading about them. Their manners are strange but you can’t help but understand the logic that underpins their philosophy of the Lethani, their laissez-faire attitude towards sex, the deep respect they have for their women fighters (telling a male Adem he fights like a girl isn’t an insult) and the creature comforts that each member possesses. Every new experience gets an in-depth rendering from this masterful author. But the saga about the Ademre gives this installment that much more punch.

The entire series is like that, however. Without realizing it, the reader is given helpful advice about everything from chewing on willow bark to relieve pain, knowing the symptoms of lead poisoning to the proper sorting and storage of apples. These books do more than entertain; they enlighten—much like the journey of Kvothe himself.

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peter1962
Apr 12, 2016

I really liked "The Name of the Wind". It was slow, especially the beginning, but it was well written and raised several interesting questions.

Unfortunately, I found "The Wise Man's Fear" a disappointment. It is still well written, but it is just too long for the minimal plot advancement which actually occurs. We get more of what we got in the first book at the University. We get too many characters telling stories to each other. We get our main character traveling to far-off lands to "become a man". We get more Denna. By the time we get to the end of the book, though, we don't know much more about the Chandrian or the Amyr.

I'll still read the 3rd book; hopefully it will live up to the standard set by the first.

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f
Favouri
Jun 21, 2016

There are three things all wise men fear: the sea in storm, a night with no moon, and the anger of a gentle man.

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hippogriff28
Jul 12, 2014

“Wil and Sim took turns watching over me as I slept, keeping me safe with their Alar. They were the best sort of friends. The sort everyone hopes for but no one deserves, least of all me.”

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hippogriff28
Jul 12, 2014

Elodin to Kvothe: “Caution suits an arcanist. Assurance suits a namer. Fear does not suit either. It does not suit you.”

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Perenelle
May 01, 2014

“There are three things all wise men fear: the sea in storm, a night with no moon, and the anger of a gentle man.”

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Perenelle
May 01, 2014

“It’s not over if you’re still here,” Chronicler said. “It’s not a tragedy if you’re still alive.”

Bast nodded eagerly at this, looking back at Kvothe.

Kvothe looked at both of them for a moment, then smiled and chuckled low in his chest. “Oh,” he said fondly. “You’re both so young.”

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MrsStrange
May 02, 2012

“It had flaws, but what does that matter when it comes to matters of the heart? We love what we love. Reason does not enter into it. In many ways, unwise love is the truest love. Anyone can love a thing because. That's as easy as putting a penny in your pocket. But to love something despite. To know the flaws and love them too. That is rare and pure and perfect.”

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LoveJuvenileFiction thinks this title is suitable for 25 years and over

unbalancedbutfair Apr 19, 2012

unbalancedbutfair thinks this title is suitable for 17 years and over

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bookKITTY
Jun 27, 2011

bookKITTY thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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