Fellini satyricon

Fellini satyricon

Blu-ray Disc - 2015 | Italian
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Follows the exploits of two pansexual young men, the handsome scholar Encolpius and his vulgar, insatiably lusty friend Ascyltus, as they move through a landscape of free-form pagan excess.
Publisher: [Place of publication not identified] :, [Publisher not identified],, [2015]
Edition: Blu-ray special edition
ISBN: 9781604659498
Characteristics: video file,Blu-ray,region A
1 videodisc (130 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in
Alternative Title: Satyricon


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Jan 30, 2018

This is a highly unusual film: highly fragmentary (like the bits of surviving text its based on), obscene, cruel, and unintelligible. (Would it not be great if a very long series of films were made of Plutarch's Lives instead (if one has to choose from the classics)?) Because its one odd episode after another, there is not much of a plot. Very awkward; one must be rather patient and a bit knowledgeable (I had already read Petronius, though many years ago) in order for it to be bearable.

Jan 05, 2016

Read those glowing reviews and comments on this "Masterpiece" and decided to check it out but this Roman stage play was too bizarre and bohemian for my taste ... Fast forward, faster forward and skip skip skip ... eject.

Jul 08, 2015

This is a classic art film. It is a random set of scenes in the Roman era depicting the over-sexed age as it was written by the scholars. It is Fellini at his best. It is meant for the viewer to be witness to bizarre and outlandish acts. The costumes (nudes as well) are loud and shocking. The music (human cries as well) are a backdrop for the visual show. Meanwhile the events are happening around the two boys who are frolicking and running from one place to another, losing each other along the way. The young boys are pretty and attractive to the crowds around them. People are bought and sold in that time. Fellini made many art films which are all classic for various reasons. Roma is unique and a must watch for Fellini fans, it is set in modern day (1950's) Rome with the piattza's (sp) and houses inside and out, random filming of actual people in the city.

Dec 12, 2014

Loosely based on the ribald satire written by first century Roman courtier Petronius, the remaining text of which only exists in random fragments, Fellini’s phantasmagorical traipse through ancient Rome follows the misadventures of hot-tempered Encolpius, his nemesis and sometime lover Ascylitus, and Giton, the pretty boy whose affections they constantly vie for. Their adversarial relationship will take them from the steamy confines of a Roman bathhouse, to a gay wedding aboard a slave ship, to a watery oracle where Encolpius is afflicted with impotence after he accidentally kills the resident god. And throughout it all is Fellini’s signature talent for incorporating the absurd and the grotesque in a manner that is at once dreamlike and nightmarish with images of pagan decadence and casual brutality competing with passages of artistic genius: a gigantic stone bust of Caesar is dragged through a public square, a Minotaur’s maze is ablaze with sunlight and bloodstained frescoes, and an old fashioned bacchanal filled with boorish noblemen and their elaborately coiffed and painted wives suddenly resembles an antique frieze as everyone pauses to stare into the camera. This is a bored and weary society whose insatiable appetites for lust and cruelty has deadened their ability to comprehend the omnipresent art which adorns every wall, and the artists which create it. Like its source material, Fellini’s masterpiece is itself fragmentary and episodic consisting of brief vignettes and elaborate tableaux which jump back and forth through time giving us the impression of an epic rather than a sequential narrative. Casually throwing out thoughts on art, love, and mortality along the way, he manoeuvres his characters through an increasingly surreal Roman Empire before abruptly consigning them back to the pages of history in what has to be one of cinema’s more clever endings. In Fellini’s own words, “I am examining ancient Rome as if this were a documentary about the customs and habits of the Martians.” Pure joy from start to finish!

Nov 29, 2014

Oh, me!... Oh, my!... Satyricon is, without question, one of those utterly grotesque and highly subjective films that I think rightly warrants psychoanalysis. It really does.

Satyricon is something of a glutton's insatiable romp down "Depravity Lane". And, believe me, it's not a pleasant stroll (unless, of course, you happen to be a totally depraved glutton for punishment).

Set in Imperial Rome during that mighty reign of Nero (in 60 AD), Satyricon is a literal madhouse of non-stop "WTF?" moments that will either deliver great pleasure or else sicken you with its outright repulsiveness.

Filled to overflowing with ghastly-looking characters, homosexual overtones, torture and cruelty, Satyricon certainly didn't leave a whole lot to the imagination.

Filmed in 1969, Satyricon was directed (with an obvious cynical glee) by Federico Fellini.

Personally, I found this film's twisted story of ancient times to be quite an ugly movie-experience that, regardless of its truly weird and bizarre nature, wore out its welcome (and its novelty) within its first 30 minutes.

Jul 25, 2012

Satyricon is more like a stage play with multiple backdrop settings. If you don't know Fellini and are easily offended by his take on certain subjects, it is best you avoid it. This is his view on a decadent Rome in ancient times. Visually is is stunning and this is one big plus of the film.

Qarlos Jun 06, 2012

Best to watch this as a sci-fi movie as its vision of ancient Rome is surreal. Not for everyone...


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