Truman Capote's In Cold Blood

Truman Capote's In Cold Blood

Blu-ray Disc - 2010
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November 15, 1959, 2 a.m. In the rural town of Holcomb, Kansas, the four members of the Clutter family were roused from their sleep. They were bound and gagged, and then brutally murdered by two unknown assailants. Perry Smith and Dick Hickock were later captured, sentenced and imprisoned. They would be executed in 1965. Author Truman Capote came to Holcomb to research the case, spending weeks talking with the prisoners, jurors, police, friends and neighbors, all in an effort to try to understand why such a senseless act was committed and what society's response might be. This film is based on Capote's best-selling novel.

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a
akirakato
Mar 15, 2017

This is a 1967 docudrama directed by Richard Brooks, based on Truman Capote's book of the same name.
It is a realistic account of real-life crime and punishiment.
The film follows the trail of two murderers (Smith and Hickock), who break into the home of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas, kill all four members of the family.
Then both men go on the run, and are found and caught by the police, tried for the murders, and eventually executed.
Why did they kill four of those innocent people?
It is a shocking and psychologically thought-provoking docudrama.
No wonder the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.

m
maipenrai
Aug 08, 2016

Amazing book - great film!! Some critics consider Capote's work the original non-fiction novel, though other writers had already explored the genre, but not with such success. It has been especially lauded for its extensive detail and simultaneous triple narrative, which describes the lives of the murderers, the victims, and other members of the rural community in alternating sequences. The psychologies and backgrounds of Hickock and Smith are given special attention, as well as the complex relationship that existed between them during and after the murders. Capote was disappointed that the book failed to win the Pulitzer Prize. Ironically, Harper Lee who helped him write "In Cold Blood" won the award for "To Kill a Mockingbird" I would highly recommend reading the book and then seeing the film if you are unfamiliar with the work. bookwoman & AbbyTabby

ChampionMDR Aug 05, 2015

Actually, the two bio flicks on Truman Capote - one with Toby Jones, and the other with Hoffman - are much more interesting . They give better, overall coverage of the murders and killers as well as more insight into Capoye himself.

g
Gizmo_Joe
Jun 01, 2015

1967's In Cold Blood is really quite a remarkable and riveting motion picture in many ways. Even today, nearly fifty years later, this is certainly one unique film-experience that still holds up very well.

Impressively filmed in a semi-documentary style, In Cold Blood tells the true-life story of 2 young men who senselessly murder the Clutter family for a large sum of money that was supposed to be hidden in a safe in their Kansas farmhouse.

Masterfully directed by Richard Brooks, this compelling picture was based on Truman Capote's book of the same name. The film's exceptional b&w camera-work was done by Conrad Hall.

For anyone who's at all interested in seeing a fine example of first-rate movie-making from the 1960s, I recommend this picture very highly.

7duffy Jun 28, 2014

I can't explain it, but when it starts off, it has a Twilight Zone feel to it....could be the music used for effect. However, that feeling fades away and it settles into a start contrast of good and evil. The Black & White cinematography looks almost 3D at some points, adding an eerie underscore to what is going on in the film. Well made, well directed, well acted, holds true to Capote's real life crime novel. Has to be Robert Blake's best film and Scott Wilson was his equal on screen.

b
BloomFree
Apr 06, 2014

A lot of viewers will need to get past the oldness of this film - including bat-like cars but the film is a high-quality "snapshot" of a problem which continues to this day in our society. What do we do with anti-social and emotionally damaged people with poor judgment. The two hanging executions as shown both made a statement and let the viewer decide how they felt about it.

f
Fuzzy_Wuzzy
Nov 01, 2012

Without question, In Cold Blood (from 1967) is filmmaking at its absolute finest._____ Incisive, engrossing, unsensational, with a masterful script and direction by Richard Brooks, In Cold Blood is a powerful, emotionally-charged film that never loses its grip on the heart-pounding suspense and drama, not even for a single minute._____ Ingeniously filmed in stark b&w, this is a truly chilling "documentary-style" re-creation of the utterly sad and senseless murders, in 1959, of a Kansas farm family._____ From my perspective, In Cold Blood's only real flaw was the somewhat unrealistic portrayal of the Clutter family. This depiction of them and their homelife was just a tad too wholesome for my liking. _____ But, all the same, I can easily forgive this irrelevant flaw since it didn't mar the story in any way._____ *Movie Trivia Note* - This was the very first mainstream film to use the word "bullshit" in its dialogue.

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Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

An intensely bleak docudrama, based on the Truman Capote "nonfiction" novel. Screenwriter/director Richard Brooks' vision for the film is enhanced with his choosing the starkness of black and white. Quincy Jones' score adds drama and depth. Great cinematography. In one of Robert Blake's final scenes with the Reverend, he's pouring his heart out about his father, next to a window. The reflection of the rain from the window on Blake's face gives the illusion of tears streaming down - an ingenious shot. Locations for the film were actually shot in the home where the family was massacred - rather freakin' ghoulish and unnecessary in my opinion. Nevertheless, a well made piece. FIVE STARS.

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m
Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Dick: "That waitress - nice piece o' blonde chicken." Perry: "Why'd ya pick me for this job?" Dick: "A perfect score needs perfect partners. Together, we're a perfect fit." Perry: "It's your score. Where do I fit in?" Dick: "I got you figured for a 'natural born killer'... Now, did you lie about that punk in Vegas?" Perry: "...No." Dick: "Why'd you kill him?" Perry: "No special reason. Just the hell of it." Dick: "That's the best reason of all. Back there... you wanted to kill me... just for a second. Right?" Perry: (shrugs) "...It passed."

m
Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Dick: "Next move... Mexico. Once we beat it out of the country." Perry: "On what? Forty three dollars, and a smile, and bullsh*t." (First use of the word 'bullsh*t' in a Hollywood film)

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Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Tex Smith (to Alvin Dewey): "...I guess I haven't seen him for five or six years. That's not surprising, though - he's a 'lone wolf' just like me. You guys can rest easy on one thing, sure. You won't be havin' any more trouble with Perry. He learned his lesson for sure. He wrote me from prison, I wrote him right back, pronto. "Boy, you take your punishment with a smile. And I didn't raise you to steal. So don't expect me to cry just because you got it tough behind the bars." Perry's no fool. He knows when he's beat. You fellas have got him whipped forever. The law is the boss. He knows the difference between right and wrong, you can bet on that, because I taught my kids the 'golden rule'. "Always tell the truth. Always wash in the morning. Always be sober and independent." And I showed him how. How to prospect, how to trap fur, how to carpenter, how to bake bread, how to be his own boss... Yes, he's a chip off the old block, alright..."

m
Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Perry (to Alvin Dewey): "It doesn't make sense. I mean, what happened. Or why. It had nothing to do with the Clutters. They never hurt me - they just... happened to be there. I thought Mr. Clutter was a very nice gentleman... I thought so right up to the time I cut his throat."

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Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Perry (to the Clutter girl, after he stopped Dick from raping her): "I despise people who can't control themselves."

m
Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Dick: "Hey Andy? Does it tell anywhere in them books what happens when you make 'the big drop'?" Andy (in adjacent cell): "Well, your neck breaks... you crap your pants."

m
Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Reporter: "I see the hangman's ready. What's his name?" Alvin Dewey: "We The People."

m
Monolith
Jun 07, 2012

Officer (before the gallows): "Anything you'd like to say? ...Perry?" Perry (his last words): "I think maybe, I'd like to apologize, but who to? ...Who...?"

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